Throwntogetherness

or, the juxtaposition of previously unrelated trajectories

Care-Work on Fieldwork

Reblogging from 2015: Every time I publish an article based on my personal PhD experiences with fieldwork, I tell myself it will be the last. So far, I have four. … Continue reading

June 24, 2019 · 6 Comments

Saying yes, saying no: 4 years tracking my voluntary academic activities

Recently in my Twitter circle, I’ve been part of a few conversations about academic workloads, work-life balance, and managing the pressure of early career researcher decision-making. It forced me to … Continue reading

May 27, 2019 · 1 Comment

Three Words 2018: Less, Dwell, Write

In the last few years I have been choosing some focus words for each year, rather than a New Year’s Resolution. In 2018, after reflecting on the words and things … Continue reading

January 8, 2019 · 2 Comments

Be gone, cruel voices

I’m pretty sure I’m not alone in this. I’m thinking of when you have something important to do, to say, but become paralysed by your uncertainty about your ability — … Continue reading

August 29, 2017 · 5 Comments

Five things I learned while editing my thesis into a book

It has been some time now since I published the posts on writing your book proposal for an academic book coming out of your thesis (see also this and this). … Continue reading

July 26, 2017 · Leave a comment

Vulnerability and Learning to be Affected

I’ve been struggling with an article for a long time. This piece of writing has evolved through 5 or 6 complete revisions and framings (and many, many more versions), including … Continue reading

April 20, 2017 · 4 Comments

How to do slow reading

My previous post ‘slow scholarship starts with slow reading’ prompted some questions around slow reading. What do I really mean by slow reading, and how do we do it? It … Continue reading

December 28, 2016 · 6 Comments

Slow Scholarship starts with Slow Reading

I wonder if you know the feeling: You have a few hours, or a day, to get some writing done — to get it finished, in fact! You have been … Continue reading

December 22, 2016 · 6 Comments

Writing your Book Proposal II: What happens after submitting your proposal?

After submitting your proposal, it’s time for the waiting game. It will go to peer review, then you will need to respond, then it might go before a board, all … Continue reading

December 13, 2016 · 2 Comments

Turning your PhD into a book

As I was racing to the submission finish line with my PhD thesis in August 2012, I constantly doubted whether certain sections were ‘done’ or ‘good enough’. One of the … Continue reading

December 7, 2016 · 2 Comments

Being a Public Intellectual

Today I was interviewed by a PhD scholar  researching ‘public’ geographers and public intellectuals more generally. I’m not sure if I was being researched as an actual public geographer, or … Continue reading

April 6, 2016 · 11 Comments

Insecurities as a mum-employee

Today I had a major work-fail moment. I was organising honours students presentations, and had already underorganised that normally-well-attended event. It was first thing in the morning following a public … Continue reading

June 2, 2015 · 5 Comments

Writing First Year Geography Lectures

I’ve been very quiet in the blogosphere recently. Mostly because I have been preparing new lectures for a section of a first year course I am teaching. I taught first … Continue reading

May 20, 2015 · Leave a comment

Academic mothering: reflections from guest blogger Dr Ann Hill

My friend and colleague Ann Hill has contributed a blog post for me today, inspired by the conversations we have had about managing our academic and mothering practices. Dr Ann … Continue reading

April 22, 2015 · 1 Comment

On writing: Spew drafts in the Phd process

I have recently been working through a book with some PhD students in my department. The book is Alison B Miller’s Finish Your Dissertation Once and For All! How to … Continue reading

March 24, 2015 · 3 Comments

Managing Maternity-related Gaps in your CV Part II: Upbeat ways to make caring work visible

When it comes to applying for jobs as a mother, there seems to be two approaches to explaining any gaps in your CV. The first approach is to maintain that … Continue reading

February 17, 2015 · 2 Comments

Managing Maternity-Related CV Gaps Part I: The ‘ideal fit’

Early career researchers are often applying for a limited number of jobs in a really competitive market. In New Zealand, this is compounded by the fact that universities are partly … Continue reading

February 4, 2015 · 2 Comments